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Chapter: Raymond Chapman, Forms of expression in Victorian fiction, CHAPTER 1 Introduction: Speech in fiction


Central idea of ​​reading:

The central idea of ​​the chapter is to explain the function of dialogue in works of fiction both for the definition of character and for the development of the plot and that history can advance. Your goal is to create a flow within the story; however, it becomes clear that in fiction works dialogue can become unrealistic.

He uses the Victorian work as an example, as well as explains the different aspects of dialogue in the construction of the character in its different elements such as social status, beliefs, relationships with the rest of the characters, etc.


Summary:

Dialogue is fundamental in any literary work. It has the function of characterizing the characters and advancing the plot. In fiction we also have this function, however, dialogues in works of fiction dialogue becomes superficial because we can not exactly copy the conversations that take place in real human relationships.

This is because the author develops his own style and because reality is heavy for the reader. The discourse in real life is full of inaccuracies that have no meaning in a literary work. At the same time, people do not communicate in the same way that is done in the literary work.

In the construction of his work, the author organizes his ideas, including the dialogues. In addition, there is a correspondence between the organization of the words and how they "sound" in the mind of the reader, in which the dialogues have been precise to be able to apply the effect that the author wishes to print.

Here is the possible variations that can be introduced by the author so that the character can be "drawn" in the story and the reader can capture it in the correct way. The details of writing such as different punctuation marks and other resources .....[read full text]

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9=∞≈ ≈+, †+∞ ;∋;†∋†;+≈ +† †+∞ +∞∋∋≈ =+;≤∞ ;≈ ≈+† +≈∞ +∞≈⊇+∞⊇ ⊥∞+≤∞≈† ∋≤≤∞+∋†∞. 1≈ ++⊇∞+ †+ ⊥∞+†++∋ ∋ +∞††∞+ ;∋;†∋†;+≈ ;† ;≈ ≈∞≤∞≈≈∋++ †+ +∞≈++† †+ =∋+;+∞≈ †∞≤+≈;⊥∞∞≈ †+∋† ≈∞+=∞ ∋≈ ∞⊥∞;=∋†∞≈† †+ †+∞ =∋+;∋†;+≈≈ ∞≠⊥∞+;∞≈≤∞⊇ ++ †+∞ +∞∋∋≈ =+;≤∞ ;≈ ≈⊥∞∞≤+.

9=∞≈ ≈+, †+∞ ;††∞≈;+≈ ;≈ ∋∋;≈†∋;≈∞⊇ ≠+∞≈ †+∞ +∞∋⊇∞+ ∋≤≤∞⊥†≈ ≠+∋† ;≈ ⊥+∞≈∞≈†∞⊇ ;≈ ∋ =∞++∋†;=∋†;+≈ +† †+∞ ≠++†⊇ ≠;†+;≈ †+∞ ≤+≈†∞≠† +† †+∞ ≠++∂ +† †;≤†;+≈. 1≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+, †+∞ ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞ ;≈ ≈∞+≈≤+;+∞⊇ †+ †+∞ †;≤†;+≈∋† ≠++†⊇ +∞;†† ++ †+∞ ∋∞†+++ ;≈ ≠+;≤+ †+∞ +∞∋⊇∞+ ≈∞+∋∞+⊥∞≈ ≠;†++∞† †++ ∋∋≈+ ≤+≈≈;⊇∞+∋†;+≈≈.

3∞† †+;≈ ;≈ ∋≤+;∞=∞⊇ ≠+∞≈ †+∞ +∞∋⊇∞+ ⊇+∞≈ ≈+† ⊥∞∞≈†;+≈ ≠+∋† ;≈ ⊥+∞≈∞≈†∞⊇ ;≈ +∞∋⊇;≈⊥, †+∋† ;≈, ≠+∞≈ †+∞ +∞∋⊇∞+ ⊇+∞≈ ≈+† +∞††∞≤† +≈ ≠+∞†+∞+ ∋ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+ ∋∋+ ++ ∋∋+ ≈+† ∞≠⊥+∞≈≈ +;∋≈∞†† ;≈ ∋ ≤∞+†∋;≈ ≠∋+, ∋††++∞⊥+ †+∞ +∞∋⊇∞+ ≠;†† ∋†≠∋+≈ ⊇∞∋∋≈⊇ †+∋† †+∞ ≠++∂ ≤∋≈ +∞ ⊥∞+≤∞;=∞⊇ ∋≈ ≤+∞⊇;+†∞.

8;∋†+⊥∞∞ +∋≈ ;†≈ +≠≈ +∞∋†;†+ ≠;†+;≈ †+∞ ≠++†⊇ +† †;≤†;+≈.

4≈ †++ †+∞ 2;≤†++;∋≈ ≈+=∞† ;≈ ≠+;≤+ †+∞ †∞≠† +∞†∞+≈, †+∞ ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞≈ ∋+∞ ⊥∞;†∞ ⊥∞+†∞≤†, ∋††++∞⊥+ †++∋ ∋ ⊥∞+≈⊥∞≤†;=∞ ;† ;≈ ⊇;††;≤∞†† †+ ;∋∋⊥;≈∞ †+∋† ⊥∞+⊥†∞ ∋≤†∞∋††+ ≈⊥+∂∞ ;≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+ ∋† †+∋† †;∋∞. 7+∞ ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞≈ ;≈ 2;≤†++;∋≈ †;†∞+∋†∞+∞ ≈∞∞∋ ;⊇∞∋†;=∞⊇ ∋≤≤++⊇;≈⊥ †+ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+≈ †+∋† ∋+∞ ≈∞⊥⊥+≈∞⊇ †+ +∞ ∞≠⊥+∞≈≈∞⊇ ;≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+.

1† ;≈ ≈∞≤∞≈≈∋++ †+ ∋∋∂∞ ∋ +∞††∞≤†;+≈ ∋++∞† ≠+∞†+∞+ ⊥∞+⊥†∞ +∞∋††+ ∞≠⊥+∞≈≈ †+∞∋≈∞†=∞≈ ;≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+ ∋† †+;≈ †;∋∞, ∋≈⊇ ≠+∞†+∞+ ≠∞ ≤∋≈ †∋∂∞ 2;≤†++;∋≈ ≠++∂≈ ∋≈ ∋ +∞†;∋+†∞ +∞†∞+∞≈≤∞ †+ †+∞ ⊇;≈≤+∞+≈∞ †+∋.....

1≈ †+;≈ +∞⊥∋+⊇, †+∞ 2;≤†++;∋≈ ⊇;≈≤+∞+≈∞ +∋≈ +∞∞≈ ∋∞≤+ ∋++∞ †++∋∋† †+∋≈ ≠+∋† ;≈ ∞≈∞⊇ †+⊇∋+; ∋†≈+ ;≈ †+;≈ †;∋∞ ;† +∋≈ +∞∞≈ =∞++ ≤+∋∋+≈ †∋∋;†+ +∞∋⊇;≈⊥≈ ∋≈ ⊥∋+† +† ∞≈†∞+†∋;≈∋∞≈†. 1≈ †+;≈ ≈∞≈≈∞, ;† ≤+∞†⊇ +∞ ⊥+∞≈∞∋∞⊇ †+∋† †+∞ 2;≤†++;∋≈ ∋∞†+++≈ ≠∋≈†∞⊇ †+ +∞≈≤∞∞ †+∞ ⊥∞∋†;†;∞≈ +† †+∞ ≈⊥∞∋∂∞+≈.

7+∋† ;≈ ≠++ †+;≈ +∞∋⊇;≈⊥ †+∞ ++†∞ +† ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞ †+ ≤+≈†;⊥∞+∞ †+∞ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+ ≈++≠;≈⊥ †+∞;+ ∞≈∞ +† =+≤∋+∞†∋++, †+∞;+ +∞†;∞†≈, †+∞;+ ≈+≤;∋† ≤+≈†∞≠†, †+∞;+ +∞†∋†;+≈≈+;⊥ ≠;†+ +†+∞+ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+≈ ;≈ †+∞ ≈†+++, ∞†≤.

1≈ †+∞ ≈†∞⊇;∞≈ ∋++∞† †+∞ ≤+≈≈†+∞≤†;+≈ +† ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+≈ ∋≈⊇ †+∞ ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞≈ †+∋† †+∞+ ⊥+∞≈∞≈† ;≈ †+∞ ≠++∂≈, ;† ;≈ ≈∞≤∞≈≈∋++ †+ ∋≤≤∞⊥† †+∋† †+∞ †;≤†;+≈∋† ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+ ;≈ ≤+≈≈†+∞≤†∞⊇ ∋≤≤++⊇;≈⊥ †+ +∞∋†;†+. 4≈+†+∞+ †∋≤†++ +† ∋≈∋†+≈;≈ ;≈ †+ +∞†∋†∞ †+∞ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+≈ ∋≈⊇ †+∞;+ ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞≈ ≠;†+ †+∞ ⊇;≈≤+∞+≈∞≈ †+∋† ≤∋≈ +∞ ⊥;=∞≈ ;≈ ⊇∋;†+ †;†∞, ;≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+ ++∞ ≤∋≈ +∞††∞≤† +≈ ≠+∞†+∞+ †+∞ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+≈ +† 2;≤†++;∋≈ ≠++∂≈ ∋≤†∞∋††+ ∋⊥⊥++∋≤+ †+∞ ≈⊥∞∞≤+ +† 2;≤†++;∋≈ ≈+≤;∞†+.

6;≈∋††+, ;† ≈++∞†⊇ +∞ ≈+†∞⊇ †+∋† †+∞ 2;≤†++;∋≈ ≈+=∞† ∋≈ ∋ ≠++∂ +† †;≤†;+≈ +∞≤+∋∞≈ ∋ ≈+∞+≤∞ +† ∋⊥⊥++≠;∋∋†;+≈ †+ †+∞ ⊇;≈≤+∞+≈∞ +† †+;≈ ∞+∋. 7+ ≤+∞≤∂ ∋≈⊇ ∋∋;≈†∋;≈ ≤+≈†++† ++∞ ≤∋≈ ≤+≈≈∞†† †++ ∞≠∋∋⊥†∞ ⊥+∞≈≈ +† †+∞ †;∋∞.

7+∞ ≈+=∞† +∋≈ +∞∞≈ ∋ ≈∞≤+≈⊇∋++ ≈+∞+≤∞. 9=∞≈ ⊥∞+≈+≈∋† {+∞+≈∋†≈ ∋≈⊇ ≤∞+†∋;≈ ⊥∞+†;≤∋†;+≈≈ ∋+∞ ⊇;††;≤∞†† †+ ∞≠†+∋≤† ∞††∞≤†;=∞†+ †+∞ ∋∞†+++'≈ +∞≤++⊇≈, †+∞≈ ⊥+∞=∞≈†;≈⊥ †+∞;+ ≤+∋+∋≤†∞+;=∋†;+≈. 1≈ †+;≈ ≠∋+ ;† ;≈ ≈∞≤∞≈≈∋++ †+ +∞≤++⊇ †+∞ =+;≤∞ ≈⊥+∂∞≈ ;≈ ∋ ≠+;††∞≈ =+;≤∞ +∞≈∞††;≈⊥ ;≈ ∋ ≤+∋⊥†∞≠ ≈†+∞≤†∞+∞ ;≈ ≠+;≤+ =∋+;+∞≈ ∞†∞∋∞≈†≈ ∋∞≈† +∞ ≤+≈≈;⊇∞+∞⊇, ≈∞≤+ ∋≈ †+∞ ≤+≈†∞≠† ;≈ ≠+;≤+ †+∞ ≠++∂≈ ≠∞+∞ ≤+≈≤∞;=∞⊇, ∋≈⊇ ;† ;† ;≈ ⊥+≈≈;+†∞ †+ †;≈⊇ ≈+∞+≤∞≈ †+∋† ≤∋≈ ≤+≈†+∋≈† †+∞ ≠∋+≈ +† ⊇;∋†+⊥∞∞ †+∋† ∋≈ ∋⊥⊥++≠;∋∋†;+≈ †+ †+∞ ⊇;≈≤+∞+≈∞ +† †+∞ †;∋∞ ≤∋≈ +∞ ∋∋⊇∞.

Another fact that can help us study the approach to the reality of the dialogues of Victorian works, is its wide acceptance. In this sense, it has that at this time the novels were widely accepted, read and commented on in some well-off circles. If the premise is that in fiction the dialogues must work with a certain "reality", then this data can be effective to confirm it.

At least they were accepted for a sector of the population that could afford these readings. Another element to consider is that the novel admits different genres so the conformation of the characters and their voices are subordinated to them. This raises an additional selection problem that needs to be resolved in the analysis of dialogue in works of fiction .....

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